COVID-19 Diary – Number 1 (April 1, 2020)

A reader suggested that while this pandemic continues, I keep an open diary on this site with frequent short entries focusing (though not exclusively) on investment and the markets. This is the first of these posts. Markets are less concerned about the virus itself than with the recessionary impact of the lockdowns and quarantines.  That perspective … Continue reading COVID-19 Diary – Number 1 (April 1, 2020)

The Computer’s Role in the Recent Wild Market Swings

Computerized stock trading has played a not-insignificant role in recent violent stock market swings.  Of course, behind these swings are the perennial drivers of market lurches: fear and greed.  Fear rules whenever investors feel insecure or uncertain, but it’s greed’s turn when investors judge that the fear has created a buying opportunity that despite uncertainty … Continue reading The Computer’s Role in the Recent Wild Market Swings

A Question of Objectives and Asset Allocation

I recently received a question accompanied by an interesting description of an asset allocation debate.  It gets to the nub of several investment principles underlying Bite-Sized Investing.  To put my response in perspective, I quote  from the communication. “A few years ago, I bought stock for my retirement account in one of the great computer-related … Continue reading A Question of Objectives and Asset Allocation

Why We Should Be Careful With Statistics

After I voiced skepticism in my recent post about the Business Roundtable’s newfound interest in stakeholders (in addition to shareholders), readers have asked how we could judge –– with hard, meaning statistical evidence –– whether the decision-makers in these firms really do consider all stakeholders.  The short answer is that it would be all but … Continue reading Why We Should Be Careful With Statistics

What Motivated the Business Roundtable to Move to the Left?

Not too long ago, the Business Roundtable shocked both the business and the political communities when it revised its statement on corporate responsibility.  The Roundtable, composed of the chief executive officers (CEOs) of 181 of the nation’s major corporations, stated that companies are responsible not only to their shareholders, but also to a broad array … Continue reading What Motivated the Business Roundtable to Move to the Left?